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An Ulverstone gun dealer has avoided prison after pleading guilty to crimes involving a World War II machine gun and thousands of dollars of criminal proceeds. Andrew Stewart Morrison, the owner of Tas Guns N' Ammo, was sentenced via videolink from Devonport to the Hobart Supreme Court on Wednesday. Morrison had pleaded guilty to 13 charges of unlawful trafficking in firearms, and four counts of dealing with the proceeds of crime. The court heard the first trafficking charge and the four charges of dealing with the proceeds of crime related to the sale of a 1943 Inglis Bren Machine Gun. Morrison sold the unregistered gun through a third party to a man on the mainland, who intended to use it for military reenactments. The man paid more than $15,000 for the gun, which was paid by installments of cash and deposits into Morrison's bank account, but not recorded in the business's books. Morrison was also found guilty of possessing two re-birthed Phoenix Arms semi-automatic pistols, which he had acquired and modified to replace the original items. Ten of the remaining charges were related to the sales of various firearms, which Morrison had on-sold before each individual weapon was registered in Tasmania. Justice Gregory Geason sentenced Morrison to 10 month in home detention, subject to the usual conditions including electronic monitoring. He told Morrison that the home detention order was an alternative to a term of imprisonment.

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An Ulverstone gun dealer has avoided prison after pleading guilty to crimes involving a World War II machine gun and thousands of dollars of criminal proceeds.

Andrew Stewart Morrison, the owner of Tas Guns N' Ammo, was sentenced via videolink from Devonport to the Hobart Supreme Court on Wednesday.

Morrison had pleaded guilty to 13 charges of unlawful trafficking in firearms, and four counts of dealing with the proceeds of crime.

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The court heard the first trafficking charge and the four charges of dealing with the proceeds of crime related to the sale of a 1943 Inglis Bren Machine Gun.

Morrison sold the unregistered gun through a third party to a man on the mainland, who intended to use it for military reenactments.

The man paid more than $15,000 for the gun, which was paid by installments of cash and deposits into Morrison's bank account, but not recorded in the business's books.

Morrison was also found guilty of possessing two re-birthed Phoenix Arms semi-automatic pistols, which he had acquired and modified to replace the original items.

Ten of the remaining charges were related to the sales of various firearms, which Morrison had on-sold before each individual weapon was registered in Tasmania.

Justice Gregory Geason sentenced Morrison to 10 month in home detention, subject to the usual conditions including electronic monitoring.

He told Morrison that the home detention order was an alternative to a term of imprisonment.